Ellen MacAskill

Syria: A Humanitarian Crisis Three Years On

Syria has been in the headlines this week. It has been in the headlines for three years now. And the humanitarian crisis in a country wreaked by civil war only continues to get worse.

Why has more not been done? Why does the conflict persist? What can we do to help?

After a screening in Tuesday’s meeting of BBC Panorama’s ‘Saving Syria’s Children’, I think I speak for us all when I say we were left harrowed, speechless, and asking these questions.

On the following day the UK government announced plans to take in 500 of the most vulnerable refugees – with Nick Clegg insisting that this was an exhibition of our “open-hearted” nature – and the Glasgow University Coalition for Syrian Refugees hosted a panel discussion. The title:

‘Syria: I Can Still See Hope’

The CSR is a collaboration of societies on campus, including Amnesty International, put together to raise funds and awareness for Syria’s plight. Five speakers on Wednesday gathered to inform an audience of students and answer their questions.

First to speak was Kurt Mills, a senior lecturer in social sciences and representative of the Glasgow Human Rights Network. He tackled the day’s headlines straight away: 9.3 million Syrians need assistance and the few hundred that the UK are willing to help is a mere 0.0008% of our own population. Mills said that we should demand more than this “cynical ploy” and stop relying on the £600 million that we have donated in aid. Monetary aid is helpful, yes, but it ultimately keeps Syrians “bottled up” in an unsafe country.

Three speakers from charities stood up to describe the challenges of the situation and emphasise the good work that is already being done. Tristan Jones from Medicine Sans Frontiers outlined the struggle to deliver medical care in a warzone where hospitals themselves have been targeted. A dwindling number of doctors and resources tackling a huge number of casualties means that basic needs are often not met. MSR have been sending doctors to hidden locations, and giving vaccinations to children and antenatal care to women.

From British Red Cross, Patrick MacIntyre told us about the work of the charity in conjunction with Syrian Arab Red Crescent. They work under the principles of “impartiality and neutrality” to provide aid such as medicine, food and hygiene. An Emergency Appeal for Syria was first launched in 2012 and has been extended since.

Amby Karamchedu, president of GU UNICEF, focussed on the work being done to help children in refugee camps, such as Zaatari in Jordan, and in Syria itself. Crossing the border does not guarantee security for Syria’s 6 million affected children. UNICEF’s current aim is to “winterise” the camps so that refugees can deal with the extreme climate. Education is often neglected in Syria and the surrounding refugee camps, despite its benefits for the future of the country. Amby mentioned that campaigner Malala Yousafzai travelled to New York to urge UNICEF executives to increase focus on basic education.

The most moving speech of the night came from a courageous man who cannot be named. From the ancient city of Damascus, he fled Syria when he became endangered by the state. Many of his family and friends have met their fate since the uprisings of 2011. Recounting his story, he was overcome with emotion to the point of nearly breaking down. He urged us to recognise the “Syrian holocaust of the 21st century”.

His words silenced the room. The reaction was unanimous. No matter how many statistics we can reel off and pounds we can donate and articles we can read – nothing compares to the scale of personal tragedy that the Syrian conflict has inflicted.

The Q and A session proved interesting, with Mills pointing out that sending aid becomes more futile the longer the political situation goes un-addressed. We were urged to take individual action by donating what we can, informing ourselves and writing to MPs and newspapers.

When the question turned to the uncertain future of the country, the refugee concluded that he “can see hope as a Syrian”. The end of the conflict may not be imminent or quick, but we must continue to do all we can to give hope to Syria and its people.

If you missed the panel discussion but are interested in the Coalition for Syrian Refugees, look them up on Facebook for information and get involved at two fundraisers this Saturday the 1st, the Challenge and the Ceilidh.

 

P.S. Hello, I’m Ellen, GUAI’s new and first Press Officer! I’ll be updating the site weekly with blog posts and all the Amnesty chat you could ever need and more. See you Tuesday!

Refugee Rights, Destitution and SPB Publicity

Hey everybody,

 

It’s nice walking around campus seeing the orange Secret Policeman’s Ball posters everywhere. Plans are pretty much all in place and we’ve even got tickets on sale both online and in the real world at the QMU box office. A fair few took tickets away last week to punt to their friends, so can you guys make sure that you bring either the tickets or, preferably, the money along to the meeting tomorrow – 5pm – QMU – Committee Room 1.

This Week:

It’s a really good topic this week, we’re going to be focussing on Human Rights for Refugees and focussing on the problem destitution especially in the UK and especially Glasgow. It is a real eye opening subject and one that has a pretty big impact on almost everyone who encounters it. It is at once a pretty sad indictment of the state of human rights in the UK and a pretty inspiring example of how some small groups are making a big difference.

It will mean a wee break in format though. No tables this week, we have a presentation and video followed by a postcard writing action.

Secret Policeman’s Ball Chat:

We’re getting closer and closer to the big day and its time to start sorting out who is going to flier where and when. If you want a piece of the fliering action please fill in rota on the Doodle here:

Coming Up:

  • Secret Policeman’s Ball – 9th February
  • Lecture by  Kate Allen, Director of Amnesty International UK – 31st January

See you tomorrow,

Martin

Rob Hallam

Refugees and the Arms Trade: Running Away From the Problem

If any of you are like me and still kicking around Glasgow (or even still on campus) and missing the weekly Amnesty goodness you might enjoy this event by Amnesty Scotland next Friday at 1745 in the GUU: https://www.facebook.com/events/280172525414000/

Read the rest of this entry →

Rob Hallam

Sleep Out

GU Amnesty and S.T.A.R are having a sleep-out outside the Wolfson Medical School building on Wednesday 5th March to raise awareness of the plight of refugees and failed asylum seekers.

If you’ve got a few hours spare or you feel like a chat on your way back from the pub, come along and join us for food and hot drinks, music and banter. It’ll be cold but fun!

We have a poster promoting the event:

Sleep-out Poster